Urban First Nations health research discussion paper. A report for the First Nations Centre, National Aboriginal Health Organization. – Browne, Annette J., McDonald, Heather, & Elliott, Denielle. (2008).

Browne, A. J., McDonald, H., & Elliott, D. (2008). Urban First Nations health research discussion paper. A report for the First Nations Centre, National Aboriginal Health Organization. Ottawa, ON: National Aboriginal Health Organization.

Introduction from report:

In 2008, the First Nations Centre (FNC) of the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) requested a discussion paper that would address health research as it pertains to urban First Nations people in Canada. We attend to this request by presenting a synthesis and critical analysis of a wide range of literature, data and information gathered from a variety of sources. The focus of this report is on First Nations people. Specifically, the FNC requested that the following topics be addressed in this report:

  • Demographics of urban/off-reserve First Nations population;
  • Major data sources for urban/off-reserve First Nations health information;
  • Health status of urban/off-reserve First Nations population (where possible, compared to on-reserve or mainstream);
  • Determinants of urban/off-reserve First Nations health;
  • Jurisdictional issues affecting health care for urban/off-reserve First Nations population;
  • Trends in urban/off-reserve First Nations health research (i.e. is research activity concentrated in particular areas, or on particular issues); and,
  • Suggested topics or areas for future research.

The goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of the available data, but rather, to highlight data from various sources that provide insights into trends and patterns in health and health research in urban contexts. In certain sections, this report may be seen to have a certain “Western bias” in that we draw on research that is often generated in Western Canada. In part, this reflects our own positioning as researchers in British Columbia. However, it also reflects the patterns of data collection, information gathering, and research occurring in Canada. Our review of the literature indicates that the large majority of research related to urban First Nations peoples is being carried out in cities and centres in Western Canada and Ontario.

Article available here.