Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Ponic et al. (in press)

Ponic, P., Varcoe, C., & Smutylo, T. (in press). Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Department of Justice (DOJ) Victims of Crime Journal.

 

Link to article will be posted here when available.

Self-reported oral health among a community sample of people experiencing social and health inequities: Implications for the primary health care sector. Wallace et al. (2015)

Wallace, B., Browne, A. J., Varcoe, C., Ford-Gilboe, M., Wathen, C. N., Long, P. M., & Parker, J. (2015). Self-reported oral health among a community sample of people experiencing social and health inequities: Implications for the primary health care sector BMJ Open, 5(e009519)

Abstract from authors:

This paper describes the self-reported oral health issues among a community sample of primary care clients experiencing socioeconomic disadvantages. As part of a larger mixed-methods, multiple case study evaluating an equity-oriented primary healthcare intervention, we examined the oral health of a sample of 567 people receiving care at four clinics that serve marginalised populations in two Canadian provinces. The prevalence of self-rated poor oral health was high, and significant relationships were observed between poor oral health and vulnerabilities related to mental health, trauma and housing instability. Our findings suggest that the oral health of some Canadian populations may be dramatically worse than what is reported in existing population health surveys.

 

Article can be found here.

EQUIP Healthcare: An overview of a multi-component intervention to enhance equity-oriented care in primary health care settings. Browne et al. (2015)

Browne, A. J., Varcoe, C., Ford-Gilboe, M., & Wathen, N. on behalf of the EQUIP Research Team (2015). EQUIP Healthcare: An overview of a multi-component intervention to enhance equity-oriented care in primary health care settings. International Journal for Equity in Health, 14(152).

Abstract from authors:

This paper provides an overview of an innovative multi-component, organizational-level intervention designed to enhance the capacity of PHC clinics to provide equity-oriented care, particularly for marginalized populations. The intervention, known as EQUIP, is being implemented in Canada in four diverse PHC clinics serving populations who are impacted by structural inequities. We discuss the evidence and theory that provide the basis for the intervention, describe the intervention components, and discuss the methods used to evaluate the implementation and impact of the intervention in diverse contexts.

Article can be found here.

Missing pathways to self-governance: Aboriginal health policy in British Columbia. Lavoie et al., (2015).

Lavoie, J., Browne, A.J., Varcoe, C., Wong, S., Fridkin, A., Littlejohn, D., & Tu, D. (2015). Missing pathways to self-governance: Aboriginal health policy in British Columbia. International Indigenous Policy Journal, 6(1). Retrieved from http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/iipj/vol6/iss1/2

Abstract from authors:

This article explores how current policy shifts in British Columbia, Canada highlight an important gap in Canadian self-government discussions to date. The analysis presented draws on insights gained from a larger study that explored the policy contexts influencing the evolving roles of two long-standing urban Aboriginal health centres in British Columbia. We apply a policy framework to analyze current discussions occurring in British Columbia and contrast these with Ontario, Canada and the New Zealand Māori health policy context. Our findings show that New Zealand and Ontario have mechanisms to engage both nation- or tribal-based and urban Indigenous communities in self-government discussions. These mechanisms contrast with the policies influencing discussions in the British Columbian context. We discuss policy implications relevant to other Indigenous policy contexts, jurisdictions, and groups.

Article can be found here.

A critical second look at integrated knowledge translation. Kothari, A., & Wathen, C. N. (2013).

Kothari, A., & Wathen, C. N. (2013). A critical second look at integrated knowledge translation. Health Policy, 109(2), 187-191. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2012.11.004

Abstract from Authors:

Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) requires active collaboration between researchers and the ultimate users of knowledge throughout a research process, and is being aggressively positioned as an essential strategy to address the problem of underutilization of research-derived knowledge. The purpose of this commentary is to assist potential “knowledge users”, particularly those working in policy or service settings, by highlighting some of the more nuanced benefits of the IKT model, as well as some of its potential costs. Actionable outcomes may not be immediately (or ever) forthcoming, but the process of collaboration can result in group-level identity transformation that permits access to different professional perspectives as well as, we suggest, added organizational and social value. As well, the IKT approach provides space for the re-balancing of what is considered “expertise”. We offer this paper to help practitioners, administrators and policymakers more realistically assess the potential benefits and costs of engaging in IKT-oriented research.

 Article can be found here

A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. – Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011).

Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011). A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. Advances in Nursing Science, 34(3), 1-17.

Abstract from Authors:

Although intimate partner violence is a significant global health problem, few tested interventions have been designed to improve women’s health and quality of life, particularly beyond the crisis of leaving. The Intervention for Health Enhancement After Leaving is a comprehensive, trauma informed, primary health care intervention, which builds on the grounded theory Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion and other research findings. Delivered by a nurse and a domestic violence advocate working collaboratively with women through 6 components (safeguarding, managing basics, managing symptoms, cautious connecting, renewing self, and regenerating family), this promising intervention is in the early phases of testing.

Article can be found here