Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Ponic et al. (in press)

Ponic, P., Varcoe, C., & Smutylo, T. (in press). Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Department of Justice (DOJ) Victims of Crime Journal.

 

Link to article will be posted here when available.

Missing pathways to self-governance: Aboriginal health policy in British Columbia. Lavoie et al., (2015).

Lavoie, J., Browne, A.J., Varcoe, C., Wong, S., Fridkin, A., Littlejohn, D., & Tu, D. (2015). Missing pathways to self-governance: Aboriginal health policy in British Columbia. International Indigenous Policy Journal, 6(1). Retrieved from http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/iipj/vol6/iss1/2

Abstract from authors:

This article explores how current policy shifts in British Columbia, Canada highlight an important gap in Canadian self-government discussions to date. The analysis presented draws on insights gained from a larger study that explored the policy contexts influencing the evolving roles of two long-standing urban Aboriginal health centres in British Columbia. We apply a policy framework to analyze current discussions occurring in British Columbia and contrast these with Ontario, Canada and the New Zealand Māori health policy context. Our findings show that New Zealand and Ontario have mechanisms to engage both nation- or tribal-based and urban Indigenous communities in self-government discussions. These mechanisms contrast with the policies influencing discussions in the British Columbian context. We discuss policy implications relevant to other Indigenous policy contexts, jurisdictions, and groups.

Article can be found here.

Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. – Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011).

Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011). Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. In O. Hankivsky (Ed.), Health Inequities in Canada: Intersectional Frameworks and Practices (pp. 295-311). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Using an intersectional perspective in health services research, this book chapter is aimed at analyzing and improving health care by drawing attention to the following: how health problems are framed; why particular problems are prioritized, and thus legitimized, over others; how multiple health and social issues such as violence and trauma, chronic pain, addictions, and poverty intersect; and the importance of structuring health services in ways that address the intersecting realities of people’s lives. These areas of analysis are critical to developing strategies for mitigating the ongoing marginalizing and racializing inequities that shape the lives and health of many women in Canada.

Modelling the effects of intimate partner violence and access to resources on women’s health in the early years after leaving an abusive partner. – Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Varcoe, C., Davies, L., Merritt-Gray, M., Campbell, J., et al. (2009).

Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Varcoe, C., Davies, L., Merritt-Gray, M., Campbell, J., et al. (2009). Modelling the effects of intimate partner violence and access to resources on women’s health in the early years after leaving an abusive partner. Social Science and Medicine, 68(6), 1021-1029.

Abstract from Authors:

Although the negative health effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are well documented, little is known about the mechanisms or determinants of health outcomes for women who had left their abusive partners. Using data collected from a community sample of 309 Canadian women who left an abusive partner, we examined whether women’s personal, social and economic resources mediate the relationships between the severity of past IPV and current health using structural equation modelling. A good fit was found between the model and data for hypothesized models of mental and physical health. In the mental health model, both the direct and total indirect effects of IPV were significant. In the physical health model, the direct effect of IPV on physical health was about four times as large as the total indirect effects. In both models, more severe past IPV was associated with lower health and women’s personal, social, and economic resources, when combined, mediated the relationship between IPV and health. These findings demonstrate that the health outcomes of IPV for women who have left an abusive partner must be understood in context of women’s resources.

Article can be found here

Urban First Nations health research discussion paper. A report for the First Nations Centre, National Aboriginal Health Organization. – Browne, Annette J., McDonald, Heather, & Elliott, Denielle. (2008).

Browne, A. J., McDonald, H., & Elliott, D. (2008). Urban First Nations health research discussion paper. A report for the First Nations Centre, National Aboriginal Health Organization. Ottawa, ON: National Aboriginal Health Organization.

Introduction from report:

In 2008, the First Nations Centre (FNC) of the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) requested a discussion paper that would address health research as it pertains to urban First Nations people in Canada. We attend to this request by presenting a synthesis and critical analysis of a wide range of literature, data and information gathered from a variety of sources. The focus of this report is on First Nations people. Specifically, the FNC requested that the following topics be addressed in this report:

  • Demographics of urban/off-reserve First Nations population;
  • Major data sources for urban/off-reserve First Nations health information;
  • Health status of urban/off-reserve First Nations population (where possible, compared to on-reserve or mainstream);
  • Determinants of urban/off-reserve First Nations health;
  • Jurisdictional issues affecting health care for urban/off-reserve First Nations population;
  • Trends in urban/off-reserve First Nations health research (i.e. is research activity concentrated in particular areas, or on particular issues); and,
  • Suggested topics or areas for future research.

The goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of the available data, but rather, to highlight data from various sources that provide insights into trends and patterns in health and health research in urban contexts. In certain sections, this report may be seen to have a certain “Western bias” in that we draw on research that is often generated in Western Canada. In part, this reflects our own positioning as researchers in British Columbia. However, it also reflects the patterns of data collection, information gathering, and research occurring in Canada. Our review of the literature indicates that the large majority of research related to urban First Nations peoples is being carried out in cities and centres in Western Canada and Ontario.

Article available here.