Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Ponic et al. (in press)

Ponic, P., Varcoe, C., & Smutylo, T. (in press). Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Department of Justice (DOJ) Victims of Crime Journal.

 

Link to article will be posted here when available.

A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. – Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011).

Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011). A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. Advances in Nursing Science, 34(3), 1-17.

Abstract from Authors:

Although intimate partner violence is a significant global health problem, few tested interventions have been designed to improve women’s health and quality of life, particularly beyond the crisis of leaving. The Intervention for Health Enhancement After Leaving is a comprehensive, trauma informed, primary health care intervention, which builds on the grounded theory Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion and other research findings. Delivered by a nurse and a domestic violence advocate working collaboratively with women through 6 components (safeguarding, managing basics, managing symptoms, cautious connecting, renewing self, and regenerating family), this promising intervention is in the early phases of testing.

Article can be found here

Abuse-related injury and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder as mechanisms of chronic pain in survivors of intimate partner violence. – Wuest, J., Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., Lent, B., Wilk, P., et al. (2009).

Wuest, J., Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., Lent, B., Wilk, P., et al. (2009). Abuse-related injury and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder as mechanisms of chronic pain in survivors of intimate partner violence. Pain Medicine, 10(4), 739-747.

Abstract from Authors:

Objective.  To examine the role of abuse-related injury and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity in mediating the effects of assaultive intimate partner violence (IPV) severity, psychological IPV severity, and child abuse severity on chronic pain severity in women survivors of IPV.

Methods.  Using data collected from a community sample of 309 women survivors of IPV, structural equation modeling was used to test a theoretical model of the relationships among the key variables.

Results.  The theoretical model accounted for almost 38% of the variance in chronic pain severity. PTSD symptom severity was a significant mediator of the relationships of both child abuse severity (beta = 0.13) and assaultive IPV severity (beta = 0.06) with chronic pain severity. Lifetime abuse-related injury was also a significant mediator of the relationships between both child abuse severity (beta = 0.05) and assaultive IPV severity (beta = 0.06) and chronic pain severity. Child abuse severity made the largest significant contribution to the model (beta = 0.35). Assaultive IPV severity had a significant indirect effect (beta = 0.12) on chronic pain severity while psychological IPV severity had a significant direct effect (beta = 0.20).

Conclusions.  Management of chronic pain in IPV survivors requires attention to symptoms of PTSD, abuse-related injury, and lifetime experiences of violence. Ensuring that acute pain from injury is adequately treated and followed over time may reduce the extent of chronic pain in abused women. The results also support the importance of routine assessment for IPV and child abuse.

Article can be found here

Attributing selected costs to intimate partner violence in a sample of women who have left abusive partners: A social determinants of health approach. – Varcoe, C. M., Hankivsky, O., Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Wilk, P., Hammerton, J., et al. (2011).

Varcoe, C. M., Hankivsky, O., Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Wilk, P., Hammerton, J., et al. (2011). Attributing selected costs to intimate partner violence in a sample of women who have left abusive partners: A social determinants of health approach. Canadian Public Policy, 37(3), 359-380.

Abstract from Authors:

Selected costs associated with intimate partner violence were estimated for a community sample of 309 Canadian women who left abusive male partners on average 20 months previously. Total annual estimated costs of selected public- and private-sector expenditures attributable to violence were $13,162.39 per woman. This translates to a national annual cost of $6.9 billion for women aged 19–65 who have left abusive partners; $3.1 billion for those experiencing violence within the past three years. Results indicate that costs continue long after leaving, and call for recognition in policy that leaving does not coincide with ending violence.

Article can be found here

Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence: Impacts and interventions. Wathen, C.N., MacMillan, H.L.

Wathen, C., & MacMillan, H. (2013). Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence: Impacts and interventions. Paediatrics & Child Health, 18(8), 419 – 422. 

Abstract from Authors:

Exposure to intimate partner violence is increasingly being recognized as a form of child maltreatment; it is prevalent, and is associated with significant mental health impairment and other important consequences. The present article provides an evidence-based overview regarding children’s exposure to intimate partner violence, including epidemiology, risks, consequences, assessment and interventions to identify and prevent both initial exposure and impairment after exposure. It concludes with specific guidance for the clinician.

Article can be found here

Health care’s response to women exposed to partner violence: Moving beyond universal screening [Editorial]. – Wathen, C., & MacMillan, H. L. (2012).

Wathen, C., & MacMillan, H. L. (2012). Health care’s response to women exposed to partner violence: Moving beyond universal screening [Editorial]. JAMA, 308(7), 712-713.

Editorial can be found here

Intimate partner violence in the family: Considerations for children’s safety. Child Abuse and Neglect. MacMillan, H. L., Wathen, C. N., & Varcoe, C. M. (In Press).

MacMillan, H. L., Wathen, C. N., & Varcoe, C. M. (In Press). Intimate partner violence in the family: Considerations for children’s safety. Child Abuse and Neglect. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2013.05.005

Abstract from Authors:

Children’s exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) is increasingly recognized as a type of child maltreatment that has a level of impairment similar to other types of abuse and neglect. Despite advances in the area of IPV, the safety planning strategies recommended as part of the overall response to IPV need to be examined in terms of their implications for children. This article discusses these strategies within the context of child safety, comparing IPV safety planning with approaches aimed at reducing exposure to other types of violence such as child sexual abuse, as well as general child safety strategies. Despite the emphasis on safety planning in information available on responding to IPV, the actual effectiveness of such planning in improving safety and reducing violence is unknown. Safety planning provided to children by a parent experiencing IPV, especially when IPV is ongoing and not recognized by anyone outside the home, may lead to confusing messages for children, particularly if there is an emphasis on secrecy. While awaiting evidence about the effectiveness of specific safety planning strategies for children, we suggest basic principles and general strategies that emphasize universality in terms of education about any type of violence or abuse in the home being unacceptable, as well as the need to focus on safety in general.

Article can be found here