Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Ponic et al. (in press)

Ponic, P., Varcoe, C., & Smutylo, T. (in press). Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Department of Justice (DOJ) Victims of Crime Journal.

 

Link to article will be posted here when available.

A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. – Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011).

Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., & Wuest, J. (2011). A theory-based primary health care intervention for women who have left abusive partners. Advances in Nursing Science, 34(3), 1-17.

Abstract from Authors:

Although intimate partner violence is a significant global health problem, few tested interventions have been designed to improve women’s health and quality of life, particularly beyond the crisis of leaving. The Intervention for Health Enhancement After Leaving is a comprehensive, trauma informed, primary health care intervention, which builds on the grounded theory Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion and other research findings. Delivered by a nurse and a domestic violence advocate working collaboratively with women through 6 components (safeguarding, managing basics, managing symptoms, cautious connecting, renewing self, and regenerating family), this promising intervention is in the early phases of testing.

Article can be found here

Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. – Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011).

Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011). Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. In O. Hankivsky (Ed.), Health Inequities in Canada: Intersectional Frameworks and Practices (pp. 295-311). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Using an intersectional perspective in health services research, this book chapter is aimed at analyzing and improving health care by drawing attention to the following: how health problems are framed; why particular problems are prioritized, and thus legitimized, over others; how multiple health and social issues such as violence and trauma, chronic pain, addictions, and poverty intersect; and the importance of structuring health services in ways that address the intersecting realities of people’s lives. These areas of analysis are critical to developing strategies for mitigating the ongoing marginalizing and racializing inequities that shape the lives and health of many women in Canada.