Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Ponic et al. (in press)

Ponic, P., Varcoe, C., & Smutylo, T. (in press). Trauma- (and violence-) informed approaches to supporting victims of violence: Policy and practice considerations. Department of Justice (DOJ) Victims of Crime Journal.

 

Link to article will be posted here when available.

Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. – Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011).

Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011). Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. In O. Hankivsky (Ed.), Health Inequities in Canada: Intersectional Frameworks and Practices (pp. 295-311). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Using an intersectional perspective in health services research, this book chapter is aimed at analyzing and improving health care by drawing attention to the following: how health problems are framed; why particular problems are prioritized, and thus legitimized, over others; how multiple health and social issues such as violence and trauma, chronic pain, addictions, and poverty intersect; and the importance of structuring health services in ways that address the intersecting realities of people’s lives. These areas of analysis are critical to developing strategies for mitigating the ongoing marginalizing and racializing inequities that shape the lives and health of many women in Canada.

Closing the health equity gap: Evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations. – Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., Wong, Sabrina T., Smye, Victoria L., Lavoie, Josée G., Littlejohn, Doreen, . . . Lennox, Scott. (2012).

Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., Wong, Sabrina T., Smye, Victoria L., Lavoie, Josée G., Littlejohn, Doreen, . . . Lennox, Scott. (2012). Closing the health equity gap: Evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations. International Journal for Equity in Health, 11(59), 1-15. doi: 10.1186/1475-9276-11-59

Abstract from Authors:

Introduction

International evidence shows that enhancement of primary health care (PHC) services for disadvantaged populations is essential to reducing health and health care inequities. However, little is known about how to enhance equity at the organizational level within the PHC sector. Drawing on research conducted at two PHC Centres in Canada whose explicit mandates are to provide services to marginalized populations, the purpose of this paper is to discuss (a) the key dimensions of equity-oriented services to guide PHC organizations, and (b) strategies for operationalizing equity-oriented PHC services, particularly for marginalized populations.

Methods

The PHC Centres are located in two cities within urban neighborhoods recognized as among the poorest in Canada. Using a mixed methods ethnographic design, data were collected through intensive immersion in the Centres, and included: (a) in-depth interviews with a total of 114 participants (73 patients; 41 staff), (b) over 900 hours of participant observation, and (c) an analysis of key organizational documents, which shed light on the policy and funding environments.

Results

Through our analysis, we identified four key dimensions of equity-oriented PHC services: inequity-responsive care; trauma- and violence-informed care; contextually-tailored care; and culturally-competent care. The operationalization of these key dimensions are identified as 10 strategies that intersect to optimize the effectiveness of PHC services, particularly through improvements in the quality of care, an improved ‘fit’ between people’s needs and services, enhanced trust and engagement by patients, and a shift from crisis-oriented care to continuity of care. Using illustrative examples from the data, these strategies are discussed to illuminate their relevance at three inter-related levels: organizational, clinical programming, and patient-provider interactions.

Conclusions

These evidence- and theoretically-informed key dimensions and strategies provide direction for PHC organizations aiming to redress the increasing levels of health and health care inequities across population groups. The findings provide a framework for conceptualizing and operationalizing the essential elements of equity-oriented PHC services when working with marginalized populations, and will have broad application to a wide range of settings, contexts and jurisdictions. Future research is needed to link these strategies to quantifiable process and outcome measures, and to test their impact in diverse PHC settings.

Article can be found here

Priorities for research in child maltreatment, intimate partner violence and resilience to violence exposures: Results of an international Delphi consensus development process. – Wathen, C., MacGregor, J., Hammerton, J., Coben, J., Herrman, H., Stewart, D., et al. (2012).

Wathen, C., MacGregor, J., Hammerton, J., Coben, J., Herrman, H., Stewart, D., et al. (2012). Priorities for research in child maltreatment, intimate partner violence and resilience to violence exposures: Results of an international Delphi consensus development process. BMC Public Health, 12(1), 684.

Abstract from Authors:

Background

Intimate partner violence (IPV) and child maltreatment (CM) are major global public health problems. The Preventing Violence Across the Lifespan (PreVAiL) Research Network, an international group of over 60 researchers and national and international knowledge-user partners in CM and IPV, sought to identify evidence-based research priorities in IPV and CM, with a focus on resilience, using a modified Delphi consensus development process.

Methods

Review of existing empirical evidence, PreVAiL documents and team discussion identified a starting list of 20 priorities in the following categories: resilience to violence exposure (RES), CM, and IPV, as well as priorities that cross-cut the content areas (CC), and others specific to research methodologies (RM) in violence research. PreVAiL members (N = 47) completed two online survey rounds, and one round of discussions via three teleconference calls to rate, rank and refine research priorities.

Results

Research priorities were: to examine key elements of promising or successful programmes in RES/CM/IPV to build intervention pilot work; CC: to integrate violence questions into national and international surveys, and RM: to investigate methods for collecting and collating datasets to link data and to conduct pooled, meta and sub-group analyses to identify promising interventions for particular groups.

Conclusions

These evidence-based research priorities, developed by an international team of violence, gender and mental health researchers and knowledge-user partners, are of relevance for prevention and resilience-oriented research in the areas of IPV and CM.

Article can be found here