Abuse-related injury and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder as mechanisms of chronic pain in survivors of intimate partner violence. – Wuest, J., Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., Lent, B., Wilk, P., et al. (2009).

Wuest, J., Ford-Gilboe, M., Merritt-Gray, M., Varcoe, C. M., Lent, B., Wilk, P., et al. (2009). Abuse-related injury and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder as mechanisms of chronic pain in survivors of intimate partner violence. Pain Medicine, 10(4), 739-747.

Abstract from Authors:

Objective.  To examine the role of abuse-related injury and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity in mediating the effects of assaultive intimate partner violence (IPV) severity, psychological IPV severity, and child abuse severity on chronic pain severity in women survivors of IPV.

Methods.  Using data collected from a community sample of 309 women survivors of IPV, structural equation modeling was used to test a theoretical model of the relationships among the key variables.

Results.  The theoretical model accounted for almost 38% of the variance in chronic pain severity. PTSD symptom severity was a significant mediator of the relationships of both child abuse severity (beta = 0.13) and assaultive IPV severity (beta = 0.06) with chronic pain severity. Lifetime abuse-related injury was also a significant mediator of the relationships between both child abuse severity (beta = 0.05) and assaultive IPV severity (beta = 0.06) and chronic pain severity. Child abuse severity made the largest significant contribution to the model (beta = 0.35). Assaultive IPV severity had a significant indirect effect (beta = 0.12) on chronic pain severity while psychological IPV severity had a significant direct effect (beta = 0.20).

Conclusions.  Management of chronic pain in IPV survivors requires attention to symptoms of PTSD, abuse-related injury, and lifetime experiences of violence. Ensuring that acute pain from injury is adequately treated and followed over time may reduce the extent of chronic pain in abused women. The results also support the importance of routine assessment for IPV and child abuse.

Article can be found here

Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. – Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011).

Browne, Annette J., Varcoe, Colleen M., & Fridkin, Alycia. (2011). Addressing trauma, violence and pain: Research on health services for women at the intersections of history and economics. In O. Hankivsky (Ed.), Health Inequities in Canada: Intersectional Frameworks and Practices (pp. 295-311). Vancouver: UBC Press.

Using an intersectional perspective in health services research, this book chapter is aimed at analyzing and improving health care by drawing attention to the following: how health problems are framed; why particular problems are prioritized, and thus legitimized, over others; how multiple health and social issues such as violence and trauma, chronic pain, addictions, and poverty intersect; and the importance of structuring health services in ways that address the intersecting realities of people’s lives. These areas of analysis are critical to developing strategies for mitigating the ongoing marginalizing and racializing inequities that shape the lives and health of many women in Canada.

Health care’s response to women exposed to partner violence: Moving beyond universal screening [Editorial]. – Wathen, C., & MacMillan, H. L. (2012).

Wathen, C., & MacMillan, H. L. (2012). Health care’s response to women exposed to partner violence: Moving beyond universal screening [Editorial]. JAMA, 308(7), 712-713.

Editorial can be found here

Modelling the effects of intimate partner violence and access to resources on women’s health in the early years after leaving an abusive partner. – Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Varcoe, C., Davies, L., Merritt-Gray, M., Campbell, J., et al. (2009).

Ford-Gilboe, M., Wuest, J., Varcoe, C., Davies, L., Merritt-Gray, M., Campbell, J., et al. (2009). Modelling the effects of intimate partner violence and access to resources on women’s health in the early years after leaving an abusive partner. Social Science and Medicine, 68(6), 1021-1029.

Abstract from Authors:

Although the negative health effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are well documented, little is known about the mechanisms or determinants of health outcomes for women who had left their abusive partners. Using data collected from a community sample of 309 Canadian women who left an abusive partner, we examined whether women’s personal, social and economic resources mediate the relationships between the severity of past IPV and current health using structural equation modelling. A good fit was found between the model and data for hypothesized models of mental and physical health. In the mental health model, both the direct and total indirect effects of IPV were significant. In the physical health model, the direct effect of IPV on physical health was about four times as large as the total indirect effects. In both models, more severe past IPV was associated with lower health and women’s personal, social, and economic resources, when combined, mediated the relationship between IPV and health. These findings demonstrate that the health outcomes of IPV for women who have left an abusive partner must be understood in context of women’s resources.

Article can be found here